TeachFitnessConcepts.com
Setting up the Class Information Page

Exercise groupings

Core lifts  Auxiliary Lifts

Bench Press

Incline Press

Squats

Leg Press

Power Cleans / Hang Cleans

Push Press

Hang Snatch

Arm Curls

Shoulder Press

Leg Curls

Leg Extensions

Upright Rows

Dips

Lat Pulls 

Triceps Extensions

Seated Calf Press

Bench Flies / Pec Deck

Weighted Hip Flexor

Wrist Flexor/Extensor

Sit ups.

LIFTING AREAS

CHEST ARMS LEGS

Bench Press

Shoulder Press

Incline Press

Push Press

Lat. Pulls

Bench Flies

Arm Curls

Triceps Extensions

Seated Rows

Upright Rows

Dips

Sits ups

Squats

Leg Press

Leg Extensions

Leg Curls

Toe Raises

Weighted Hip Flexor

Non-weighted / Own Body Weight Exercises

Several non-weighted exercises are taught to the students for fitness improvement. 
There are many examples of non-weighted exercises that can be selected as part of your fitness stations, circuit station program.  Here are some examples of non-weighted exercises that I recommend; Push ups, Sit ups, Bicycle dips, Chair or bench dips, Trunk rotations, Back hyperextensions Hip flexor.

Portable Fitness Stations

With the use of portable fitness equipment from Performbetter.com, you can set up a great fitness station/circuit training session in any open space in your facility.
Here are some portable fitness exercises that I recommend for you to consider buying to set up an awesome core strength fitness circuit;

Elementary Fitness Equipment Middle School Fitness Equipment High School Fitness Equipment

6" mini hurdles (Banana Step)
12" mini hurdles (Banana Step)
15' ABC Agility Ladders
Jump Ropes
4 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Red/Gray
PB Disc Pillows (Stability Pillows)
Agility Dots
30' Training Ropes (1.5")
Valsliders
 Light Mini Bands - Yellow
Medium Mini Bands - Green
1/2" SuperBands
1' SuperBands
Bosu Sport 55 Balance Trainers
45cc Stability Balls
12" Cones






6" mini hurdles (Banana Step)
12" mini hurdles (Banana Step)
15' ABC Agility Ladders
Jump Ropes
4 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Red/Gray
6 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Yellow/Gray
PB Disc Pillows (Stability Pillows)
Agility Dots
30' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
40' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
Valsliders
 Light Mini Bands - Yellow
Medium Mini Bands - Green
Heavy Mini Bands - Blue
1/2" SuperBands
1' SuperBands
Bosu Sport 55 Balance Trainers
45cm Stability Balls
55cm Stability Balls
65cm Stability Balls
12" Cones

6" mini hurdles (Banana Step)
12" mini hurdles
(Banana Step)
30' ABC Agility Ladders
Jump Ropes
8 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Blue/Gray
10 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Orange/Gray
PB Disc Pillows (Stability Pillows)
Agility Dots
40' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
50' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
Valsliders
 Light Mini Bands - Yellow
Medium Mini Bands - Green
Heavy Mini Bands - Blue
Extra Heavy Mini Bands - Black
1" SuperBands
1 3/4" SuperBands
2 1/2" Super Bands
Bosu Balance Trainers
45cm Stability Balls
55cm Stability Balls
65cm Stability Balls
75 cm Stability Balls
First Place Elite Kettlebells in the following weights;
 8kg/Yellow (17.6 lbs)- 12kg/Green (26.4 lbs) - 16kg/Red (35.2 lbs)
12" Cones

Storage
Bosu Balance Trainer Cart - Performbetter.com
Small Portable Wire Equipment Cart - BSN Sports item #92436
Shelf for Portable wire Equipment Cart - BSN Sports item #92437

ALTERNATIVE DAY EXERCISES/ACTIVITIES

ACTIVE REST ACTIVITIES

On alternative days (non-weight training days, usually Tuesdays/Thursdays), the class will complete the following activities:

  • Cardiovascular fitness running/walking.
    Usually on the track on warm weather days. A run/walk program is used. An example would be; jog 1 lap, walk 1 lap, until the student has completed 6 - 8 total laps.
  • Plyometric training.
    Plyometric training is any training in which the body is handing/catching its own body weight during the course of jumping/bounding exercise. An example of Plyometric exercises would be, hopping up on a 18 - 24 inch box, hopping down off a 18 - 24 inch box, hopping over a low hurdle, hopping or bounding down the track with single leg bounds or double leg hops, etc.…
  • Medicine ball activity.
    With the use of a medicine ball, the student will learn to do various upper body throws and various trunk, abdominal exercises. The medicine ball can vary in weight and size. The list exercises are extensive and the exercises are usually completed in partners.
  • Jump rope routine.
    Various jump rope routines will be taught to the student. The students usually work in partners to allow for a rest interval between exercises. Several jumping variations will be taught and a jump rope skill test can be given.
  • Non-weighted exercises.
    Several non-weighted exercises are taught to the students for fitness improvement. Examples of non-weighted exercises (Auxiliary exercises) are Push ups, Sit ups, Bicycle dips, Chair or Bench dips, Trunk rotations, Back
    hyperextensions, Hip flexor, etc.…

Beginning Strength Training

Various topics taught throughout the semester
Explanation of the three basic types of strength training programs

Choosing a program

There are basically three different types of lifting programs that can be used. The three basic lifting programs are called Endurance lifting, Basic strength lifting and Power lifting.

Muscular Endurance
Muscular endurance lifting is mostly used as a beginning program for people who have not lifted weights or people who have not lifted weights for a while or adolescent students (5th grade through 8th grade) or athletes who are interested in building muscular endurance into their lifting program for an increase in duration.  In the endurance lifting program the lifter will do moderate sets (3-4) , high repetitions (10-15) and a light weight selection (60%-70% of 1RM).  Moderate sets are 3 to 4 sets in length, high repetitions are any repetitions over 10 and a low weight program is any weight selection that is between 60% to 70% of one’s maximum.  High endurance athletes will train in the endurance lifting program to get ready for their sport.  Circuit Training is used in this phase of strength training. Examples of high endurance sports are; soccer, distance running, wrestling, distance swimming, tennis, or any other sport that does not allow a long rest period during competition.

Muscular Strength
The most popular lifting program is the Basic Strength lifting.  In the basic strength lifting program the lifter will do moderate sets (3-4), moderate repetitions (8-10) and moderate weight selection (70%-80% of 1RM).  Moderate sets are 3 to 4 sets in length, moderate repetitions are any repetitions between 8 - 10 and a moderate weight program is any weight selection that is between 70% to 80% of one’s maximum.  All types of athletes will train in the basic strength training program.  It is a lifting program for anyone who has had experience in weight training and/or wants to keep fit.  It is also used as a transition phase from endurance lifting to power lifting.  It is the most widely used program by lifters.

Muscular Power
The hardest and most stressful weight lifting program is Power lifting.  In the power lifting program, the lifter will do high sets (4-6), low repetitions (2-6) and high weight (intensity) selection (80%-95% of 1RM).  High sets are 4 to 6 sets in length, low repetitions are any repetitions between 3 - 6 and a high weight program is any weight selection that is between 80% to 95% of one’s maximum. The athletes who train in the power lifting program are looking for explosive strength and large muscle mass. The football player, shot & discus thrower and any other athlete who participates in quick explosive sports will choose the power lifting routine. It will build large muscle mass.

To download the Comparison Chart
click here
Comparison Chart

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Teach the Principle of Overload
The principle of overload states that a greater than normal stress or load on the body is required for training adaptation to take place. The body will adapt to this stimulus. Once the body has adapted then a different stimulus is required to continue the change. In order for a muscle (including the heart) to increase strength, it must be gradually stressed by working against a load greater than it is used to. To increase endurance, muscles must work for a longer period of time than they are used to. If this stress is removed or decreased there will be a decrease in that particular component of fitness. A normal amount of exercise will maintain the current fitness level.

Teach the Principle of Specificity
Related to the principle of adaptation is the principle of specificity. Because the body will adapt in a highly specific way to the training it receives, a strong athletic foundation is needed before specific training methods will work optimally. The Specificity Principle simply states that for these reasons, training must go from highly general training to highly specific training. For example, if you are a sprinter, you may start out with easy running and general strength training before moving on to explosive training in the way of plyometrics or sprinting out of the blocks. If you try to do explosive, high intensity training too soon, you will run the risk of such training being ineffective and possibly resulting in injury. The principle of Specificity also implies that to become better at a particular exercise or skill, you must perform that exercise or skill. To be a good cyclist, you must cycle. The point to take away is that a runner should train by running and a swimmer should train by swimming. 

Teach the principle of Cross training
The term cross training refers to a training routine that involves several different forms of exercise. While it is quite necessary for an athlete to train specifically for their sport if they want to excel, for most sports enthusiasts, cross-training is a beneficial training method for maintaining a high level of overall fitness. For example, you may use both biking and swimming each week to improve your overall aerobic capacity, build overall muscle strength and reduce the chance of an overuse injury. Cross-training limits the stress that occurs on a specific muscle group because different activities use muscles in slightly different ways.

Benefits of Cross Training

  • Reduces exercise boredom
  • Allows you to be flexible about you training needs and plans (if the pool is closed, you can go for a run instead).
  • Produces a higher level of all around conditioning
  • Conditions the entire body, not just specific muscle groups
  • Reduces the risk of injury
  • Work some muscles while others rest and recover
  • Can continue to train while injured
  • Improves your skill, agility and balance

Teach and discuss all Safety rules that need to be followed in the weight room

Teach Universal weight machine precautions

  • Never have a partner change the pin setting for you.
  • Be sure the weight pin is inserted all the way.
  • Never slam the plates down on the weight machine.
  • Keep fingers & toes away from the machine when someone is working.

Teach the proper unloading of the bars and weight trees

  • You should take the weights off the bar by alternating from one side to the other.
  • Never take all the weights off the same side of the bar at the same time.
  • Do not take all of the weights off the same side of the weight tree.

Teach the proper spotting techniques in all free lifting exercises

  • The spotter must always be in a location were they can grab the bar at any given time, or assist the lifter with the bar if needed.
  • Be sure that you spot to your abilities.
    • Pay attention to the person you are spotting at all times. 
    • Be prepared to help the person being spotted instantly.
    • Ask the person being spotted if they would like you to put your hands on the bar for a lift-off to start the reps.
    • Before the lift-off, ask the person being spotted how many reps they are going to attempt.
    • Make sure that you can handle the weight that you are spotting. If you don't think you can handle the weight, seek the help of another person.
    • Provide only the effort that the person requires from you.  Don't grab the bar while the person is lifting.  Help them when they stall out or fail.
    • Offer encouragement to the person lifting the weight. 
    • Commutate with the lifter before the lift-off and at the end of the reps.

Stretching routines

  • Static stretching
    • Static stretching involves moving into a stretch position and then holding that position.  That is, you stretch the muscle to the farthest point and hold the stretch for a length of time between 10 to 20 seconds in length, relax the muscle being stretched, and then repeat the stretch again for another 10 to 20 seconds.  Often you will find that the second stretch will result in a further range/length of motion, than the initial/first attempt to stretch that muscle.
  • Dynamic Stretching
    • Dynamic stretching, "involves moving parts of your body and gradually increasing reach, speed of movement, or both." Do not confuse dynamic stretching with ballistic stretching! Dynamic stretching consists of controlled leg and arm swings that take you (gently!) to the limits of your range of motion. Ballistic stretches involve trying to force a part of the body beyond its range of motion. In dynamic stretches, there are no bounces or "jerky" movements. An example of dynamic stretching would be slow, controlled leg swings, arm swings, or torso twists.
    • Dynamic stretching improves dynamic flexibility and is quite useful as part of your warm-up for an active or aerobic workout (such as a dance or martial-arts class).
  • Ballistic stretching
    • Ballistic stretching uses the momentum of a moving body or a limb in an attempt to force it beyond its normal range of motion. This is stretching, or "warming up", by bouncing into (or out of) a stretched position, using the stretched muscles as a spring which pulls you out of the stretched position.  You must warm-up the muscle being stretched before engaging in this type of stretching program.  Not warming-up the muscle properly before executing this stretching technique could result in a torn or pulled muscle.
  • PNF stretching
    • PNF stretching is currently the fastest and most effective way known to increase static-passive flexibility.
    • PNF is an acronym for proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. It is not really a type of stretching but is a technique of combining passive stretching (see section Passive Stretching) and isometric stretching (see section Isometric Stretching) in order to achieve maximum static flexibility.
    • PNF refers to any of several post-isometric relaxation stretching techniques in which a muscle group is passively stretched, then contracts isometrically against resistance while in the stretched position, and then is passively stretched again through the resulting increased range of motion.
    • PNF stretching usually employs the use of a partner to provide resistance against the isometric contraction and then later to passively take the joint through its increased range of motion. It may be performed, however, without a partner, although it is usually more effective with a partner's assistance

Teach the proper range of motion.

  • Use Full range of motion in all lifts.
    Full extension to the lock-out, full contraction until the muscle stops.
  • Do Not Do 1/4 or 1/2 motions. 
    These partial motions only work a small part of the muscle that is working.

Teach the proper lifting rhythm.

Lifting Rhythm

Lifting rhythm is an important part of lifting technique. The lifting rhythm should be 4 counts with gravity and 2 counts against gravity. Another way to do this is any time the bar or weight is going down towards the floor, the count should be 4 and any time the bar or weight is going up to the ceiling, the count should be 2. The reason for this is to keep the lifter from letting gravity do the work for them and to keep the lifter from hurting themselves.

  • 4 counts with gravity (down or towards the body).
  • 2 counts against gravity (up or away from body).

Teach the proper breathing patterns.

Breathing Patterns

Breathing patterns are another important part of the lifting technique. The breathing pattern should be inhale when the bar or weight is coming towards your body and exhale whenever the bar or weight is going away from your body.  If the bar is going up and down the pattern would be inhale as the bar or weight is going down and exhale when the bar or weight is going up.  

The importance of proper breathing is to keep the lifter from blacking out or fainting. The lifter should  hold his/her breath only at certain points in the lift.  Do not hold your breath long because the pressure of holding you breath will cause blood vessels to build up and stop the blood flow to the brain.  When the blood flow to the brain has been cut off you faint or blackout.  Neither of these is good when a lifter has a weight in his/her hands.

  • Inhale whenever the bar or weight is coming towards you or downwards.
  • Exhale whenever the bar or weight is going away from you or upwards.

Fitness terms & definitions

Teach the definitions of Sets, Reps, Volume and Intensity.

Set - A group of repetitions of an exercise movement done consecutively, without rest, until a given number, or momentary exhaustion is reached. Sets are usually between 1 and 6.

Repetition - An individual completed exercise movement.
Receptions are usually done in multiples from 2 to 100.

1 Repetition Maximum (1 RM) -The maximum resistance with which a person can execute on any given exercise movement.  HOW MUCH WEIGHT CAN THEY LIFT 1 TIME!

Volume - The total number of repetitions completed on one exercise. 
                Example: 3 x 10 routine has a total volume of 30 repetitions.

Intensity - The amount of weight chosen for the resistance of that exercise.

  • The intensity is chosen as a percentage of the 1RM. Example: If the 1 RM of a particular exercise is 200 lb and the intensity (resistance) that is chosen is 60%, then the correct weight selection would be 120 lbs.

Teach partner lifting.

  • One partner will lift while one partner is spotting and resting.
  • Partner lifting is good for both lifters because it helps with the following;
  • Motivation.
  • Safety - Spotting.
  • Rest interval is good and effective.
  • It eases the congestion in the Weight Room.

Teach the importance of rest and recuperation.  Active rest/Passive rest.

  • 48 hours of rest is necessary for full recovery of the muscle that were exercised, worked, or fatigued.
  • Active rest - Any non-lifting activity that increases blood flow to the muscle tissues without fatigue.
    Example: Slow jogging, fast pace walking, shooting basketball, playing soccer, etc...
  • Passive rest - Total rest, non-activity.
    Examples: Sleeping, watching TV, playing chess.

Teach the importance of rest and recuperation.  Rest between sets

  • Between sets the lifter needs to allow a certain amount of time for muscular rest. The length of the in-between rest will be different for each type of lifting program. The following rest intervals are suggested for the following workout routines:
  • Endurance rest interval is .30 to 1 minute (short)
  • Strength rest interval is 1 to 2 minutes (medium.)
  • Power rest interval is 2 to 3 minutes (long)

Teach the importance of lifting warm-up sets and warm-down sets

Warm up activity

Proper warm up of the body is very important. To achieve this the lifter should stretch out and if possible do some type of running or jump rope routine. The warm up should last about 5 to 10 minutes in length. The stretching routine should be for all body parts, upper, lower, trunk, neck and feet. The type of stretching program that we do is call static stretching. Static means that there is no bouncing or quick movement. All stretching movements are slow and they are held for at least 10 to 15 seconds. All static stretching movement are started from a relaxed position and then the muscles is stretched to the point of pain and held for 10 counts. This is one of the better ways of stretching out.

  • A light warm-up set should be completed before any heavy set is attempted. This warm-up set will increase the quality of the heavier lifts and reduce the potential for injury
  • A light warm-down set should be completed to eliminate some of the lactic acid that is built up in the muscle tissue from the workout. The warm-down set will help reduce soreness
  • Warm up routines
    • Jump rope for 5 minutes
    • Jog for 5 minutes
    • Stationary bike for 5 minutes

Teach how to use the percentile chart.

The percentile chart will show the lifter the amount of weight they should use for their workout, based on their 1 RM amount.   
This is the intensity level (resistance) chosen.
The percentile chart has automatically rounded off the percentile to the nearest 5 pound increment.
Click on this link to download a percentile chart
percentile chart.xls

Explain the difference between Core lifts and Auxiliary lifts.

Core lifts - any lift that uses the major muscle groups or a lift that uses multi-jointed effort during the lift.  Usually a large group of muscles are at work
Examples: Bench press, Squats, Power cleans, Push press.

Auxiliary lifts - any minor muscle group. Usually a small group or individual muscles.
Example: Arm curls, Triceps extensions, Leg curls, Leg extensions.

Teach muscle grouping of exercises.

Exercises can be completed by muscle groups.

Lifting exercises are completed within a certain muscle group before going on to the next group.

The common grouping of muscles are as follows:

  • Chest / Back - Bench press, Incline press, Decline press, Lat.. pulls, Dumbbell press, Flies, Pec. deck.
  • Arms - Arm curls, Triceps extensions, Dips, Wrist roller, Wrist curls, Shoulder press, Seated Military press, Multiple dumbbell exercise, etc...
  • Legs - Squats, Leg press, Leg Curls, Leg extensions, Ram squats, Toe raises, Weighted Hip flexor, etc...

Body part concept of lifting

  • For every Front body part exercise, you should do a back body part exercise.

Examples: 
Arm - Bicep lift, then Triceps lift. 
Leg - Quad exercise, then Hamstring exercise
Chest - Bench press (Chest front), Lat Pulls (Back)

  • Each lifting day should include;
    • (2) Arm exercises (Front/Back)
    • (2) Leg exercises (Front/Back)
    • (2) Chest exercises (Front/Back)
  • Another approach to body part lifting would be as follows;
    • Monday -All Chest exercises
    • Wednesday - All Arm exercises
    • Friday - All leg exercises 

Teach the correct lifting techniques on all weighted and non-weighted exercises in the weight room

Lifting technique: Lifting technique is very important to all types of lifters. However, it is the most important to the beginning lifter. The beginning lifter must concentrate on his/her lifting technique first . This will allow the muscles to develop properly and muscle will get stronger throughout its full length. Good lifting technique will help the beginning lifter to quickly gain strength. Poor lifting technique will hurt the beginning lifter and cause problems with muscle growth and body alignment. Never neglect the importance of proper lifting technique.

  • Live demonstrations and/or video tape instruction are used to teach this part of the class
  • A skill test will be taught on the Bench Press and Parallel Squats. A check list is given to the students to help them practice for the skill test.

Lifting technique & the Beginning lifter.

Lifting technique is very important to all types of lifters. However, it is the most important to the beginning lifter. The beginning lifter must concentrate on his/her lifting technique first.

This will allow the muscles to develop properly and muscle will get stronger throughout its full length.

Good lifting technique will help the beginning lifter to quickly gain strength. Poor lifting technique will hurt the beginning lifter and cause problems with muscle growth and body alignment.

Never neglect the importance of proper lifting technique.

Teach Plyometric exercises

Box jumps, Depth jumps, Hurdle hops, Dot drill, Bounding, Skipping, Leaping, Hopping

Various Medicine ball drills, with various weighted medicine balls

Teach cardiovascular fitness  (See Benefits of Cardio respiratory Exercise.)

Jogging - Slow jog, about 2:00/2:30 minutes per lap (400 meters)

Walking - Power walking.  About 3:30/4:00 minutes per lap (400 meters)

Jump rope routines - Examples: Cross-over, Double under, Backward turns, Backward cross-over, etc...

Aerobic dances and exercises - Examples: Country line dance, Tae bo, Step Aerobics.

Circuit Training

Circuit training is a type of endurance lifting program that trains the person to lift quickly with vary little rest. In the circuit lifting program the lifter will set up several lifting stations and then do the endurance lifting program moving quickly from one exercise to another, with very little rest. The lifting cycle would be as follows: lift for 30 seconds, rest for 30 seconds, lift for 30 seconds, rest for 30 second, etc.... The lifter will continue this cycle for at least 20 minutes in length. It teaches the muscles to work hard with little rest. The key to this program is choosing the correct weight selection so that the lifter will complete at least 10 repetition in each exercise for each 30 second lifting cycle. A light weight selection is use mostly for this program. Also, this program will increase your cardiovascular endurance level, if you push yourself 

Portable Fitness Stations

Circuit training is a series of exercise stations, set up to exercise various body parts at a quick, high repetition pace, during a short time interval and with a short rest interval.  The exercise stations can be weighted (usually in a weight room) or non-weighted (gymnasium).  In a gymnasium, the exercise stations would normally be stations were the student is working against their own body weight and gravity.  Additionally this would be a good place to teach Plyometric exercises, Stability ball exercises, Fitness Testing exercise stations, Medicine Ball exercises, Flexibility stations, Balancing stations, Agility stations, and possibly Juggling stations (for hand-eye coordination).  Each exercise station should have a name and a number.  To begin the circuit, the students would start at any numbered station, they then will exercise for a certain timed interval, then rest/spot their partner, then rotate to the next numbered station, then exercise again at a new exercise station.  The time interval at each exercise station can vary and the intensity of the exercise can be adjusted according to the grade level and/or experience level of the student.  The most common exercise interval and rest interval used for circuit training is 30 seconds.

With the use of portable fitness equipment from Performbetter.com, you can set up a great fitness station/circuit training session in any open space in your facility.
Here are some portable fitness exercises that I recommend for you to consider buying to set up an awesome core strength fitness circuit;

6" mini hurdles
12" mini hurdles
15' ABC Agility Ladders
Jump Ropes
4 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Red/Gray
6 lb First Place Elite Med Balls - Yellow/Gray
PB Disc Pillows (Stability Pillows)
Agility Dots
30' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
40' Training Ropes (1.5" & 2")
Valsliders
 Light Mini Bands - Yellow
Medium Mini Bands - Green
Heavy Mini Bands - Blue
1/2" SuperBands
1' SuperBands
Bosu Sport 55 Balance Trainers
45cm Stability Balls
55cm Stability Balls
65cm Stability Balls
12" Cones

The ProgressionTeaching/Setting up the ClassTesting 1RM
EnduranceStrengthPower
IndividualizedPeaking CycleComparison Chart
Fitness Concepts
Web ResourcesFeedback Form
Home

Send email to Mark Sissom
marksissom@teachfitnessconcepts.com

CHECK LIST FOR THE BENCH PRESS

BREATHING PATTERN

  • Inhale as the bar is descending
  • exhale as the bar is ascending

BODY POSITIONING

  • Eyes directly under the bar
  • Feet flat on the floor w/heels tucked under the bench.
  • Hand grip
    1) Thumbs width from the gnarled edge.
    2) Pinkie fingers on the ring on the gnarl.

THE LIFT

  • Go command to the spotter for the lift off.
  • Slow bar descend to the mid chest. (4 counts)
  • Light touch of the bar on the chest.
  • Fast bar ascend to a lockout over the eyes (2 counts)
  • Help command to the spotter to re-rack the bar (when your reps. are completed).

CHECK LIST FOR PARALLEL SQUATS

BREATHING PATTERN

  • Inhale as the bar is descending
  • exhale as the bar is ascending

BODY POSITIONING

  • Weight belt on - proper fit.
  • Beeper on - Check the depth/beep
  • Wide hand grip on bar, w/hips and back
  • directly under the bar before lift off.
  • Slow walk-back to squat rack work area.
  • Wide stance with the feet, toes slightly out.
  • Heel flat on the floor or board
  • Chest out and chin up.

THE LIFT

  • Slow bar descend to a parallel squat (beep)
  • (4 counts)
  • Knees over toes as you squat
  • Fast bar ascend as you stand up (2 counts)
  • Slow walk back to the rack.
  • (after you have completed your reps.)

CHECK LIST FOR THE PUSH PRESS

BREATHING PATTERN

  • Inhale as the bar is descending
  • Exhale as the bar is ascending

Bar Pick Up

  • Weight belt on - proper fit.
  • Feet shoulders width apart next to the bar
  • Arms hang straight down by the side
  • Hands just outside the feet
  • Knees bend so arms can reach down to bar
  • Back Straight (No back bend)
  • Bar is picked up with the leg.
  • Arms do not bend

THE RACK (hang clean)

  • Slow knee bend (dip)
  • Good upright row pull with elbows high
  • When the bar gets above the belly button or
  • diaphragm, start the forearm snap & leg jump.
  • Feet jump at the same time forward to get under the bar.
  • Forearm snaps under the bar with elbow leading.
  • Bar comes to a stop at the high chest area.
  • Stand up with the bar with legs locked out.

THE PUSH PRESS

  • Do a good knee bend and inhale air
  • Knees push hard to a good leg lockout
  • At the same time push hard on the bar for a good arm lockout.
  • The leg lockout is just ahead of the arm lockout.
  • Hard exhale of air at the top of the lockout.
  • The weights should clang at the top. (lockout)
  • Just after the lockout of the arms and legs,
  • bring the bar back down to the high chest resting area.

CHECK LIST FOR THE POWER CLEANS

BREATHING PATTERN

  • Inhale as the bar is descending
  • Exhale as the bar is ascending

Bar Pick Up

  • Weight belt on - proper fit.
  • Feet shoulders width apart next to the bar
  • Arms hang straight down by the side
  • Hands just outside the feet
  • Knees bend so arms can reach down to bar
  • Back Straight (No back bend)
  • Bar is picked up with the leg.
  • Arms do not bend

THE RACK (clean)

  • Slow knee bend (dip)
  • Good upright row pull with elbows high
  • When the bar gets above the belly button or
  • diaphragm, start the forearm snap & leg jump.
  • Feet jump at the same time forward to get under the bar.
  • Forearm snaps under the bar with elbow leading.
  • Bar comes to a stop at the high chest area.
  • Stand up with the bar with legs locked out.

RETURNING THE BAR TO THE GROUND

  • Keeping the back straight, head and eyes up.
  • Reverse the forearm snap to the thigh area.
  • Keep the bar as close to the body as possible.
  • Keep the back straight and the upper torso erect.
  • Do not lean over with the head down.
  • Slowly lower the bar to the ground until the plates touch the floor.
  • Light bar touch on floor and then repeat the power clean.
The ProgressionTeaching/Setting up the ClassTesting 1RM
EnduranceStrengthPower
IndividualizedPeaking CycleComparison Chart
Fitness Concepts
Web ResourcesFeedback Form
Home

Send email to Mark Sissom
marksissom@teachfitnessconcepts.com